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TIM KAZULES

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF KAZULES

owner & head brewer

Tim Kazules

In the middle of his 15 year career in the biotech industry, Tim Kazules discovered craft beer while attending a Cancer Conference in Denver, Colorado. Overly impressed by his visit to The Great Divide brewing company, he decided to open his own brewery. At that time (Spring of 2009) he was 3 months into his MBA program and directed the remainder of the 2 year program towards learning the finance and management while also learning to brew beer at home. 

Following graduation from USD in December of 2010, he moved to Ventura County to build a new research imaging group at AMGEN. By October of 2014 Tim had become an award winning homebrewer, completed his business plan and raised sufficient funding to leave his Amgen job to build the brewery. Five Threads Brewing Company held their official grand opening on October 29th, 2015 and continues to receive great praise and support from the surrounding community.

 

five threads brewing company

31133 Via Colinas, Ste 109
Westlake Village, CA, 91362

ABOUT

FOUNDED IN 2015, FIVE THREADS BREWING COMPANY HAS GROWN FROM A ONE UNIT OPERATION TO AN EXPANDED THREE WHILST RAPIDLY EXPANDING DISTRIBUTION- THANKS TO THE SUPPORT AND LOVE FROM OUR CRAFT BEER LOVING COMMUNITY AND FIVE THREADS TEAM. OUR MISSION IS TO ALWAYS TAKE PRIDE IN THE BEER WE BREW AND WELCOME ANYBODY AND EVERYBODY INTO OUR SPACE. WE HOPE YOU MAKE MEMORIES WITH US ALONG THE WAY!

WHAT IS A THREAD? AND WHY FIVE?

We at Five Threads Brewing Company, LLC find the term “threads” to mean the blending or bringing together of “good things” to create “great things” such as the ingredients of our beer, the members of our team, or the members of our community coming together to share a pint!

Water, Malt, Hops, Yeast and You | The Five Ingredients of Beer

 

WATER

The bringer of life and the foundation for every great beer.

We test our water to ensure the right mineral and pH balance for each of our beers. This step makes our hops taste brighter and our malt taste fuller.

MALT

The source of beer color, body, flavor, and alcohol strength.

Barley, wheat, and rye are harvested in the fields and then allowed to sprout. The sprouted grains are dried and kilned (baked) to create flavors of biscuit, caramel, and roast. By soaking the grains in brewing water, we extract the flavors and sugars to make sweet wort (unfermented beer).

HOPS

So many hops, so little time… which qualities should the next IPA highlight? Grapefruit, pine, tropical, melon, berry, floral, lavender, spicy….

Little green clusters of goodness that grow on a vine, hops add much to a beer. Beer on its own is sweet; boiling hops adds balancing bitterness. The hop oils released act as a natural preservative while imbuing the beer with additional flavor and aroma.

YEAST

Brewers create wort; yeast creates beer!

Once called “Godisgood,” yeast consumes sweet wort and in return provides the alcohol, carbonation, flavors and aromas that make the lively refreshing substance we call beer.

YOU AND ME

Love and passion, the secret ingredients for making and enjoying a quality craft beer.

The fifth thread recognizes the craft beer brewers who dedicate their lives to creating the perfect pint and you, the craft beer drinkers, who journey to find it. 

HISTORY LESSON

A “thread” is a term sometimes used when blending two or more beers together. One of the early uses of the term comes from a story out of the 1700’s…

Once upon a time in a small English pub a patron walked up to the barkeep and asked for a blend of three “threads” of the pub’s offerings: One “thread” of Ale (a young beer that used a mixture of herbs and spices, called “gruit”, instead of hops), one of Beer (a beer made with hops), and one of “Two-pence” (a strong beer with complex flavors from extended aging).  How he knew to ask for a “thread” is hard to nail down (perhaps it sounded close to “third” in the accent of the time) but regardless the drink gained favor with the hardworking people of Old England and demand increased for this nutritious and flavorful beverage. Ralph Harwood, an entrepreneurial brewer tired of blending each drink to order, developed a recipe that combined the essence of each individual thread. This recipe had such an appeal that it became the first beer style brewed on an industrial scale (the Porter).

 
 
 
 
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